Foreign Minister Discusses ASEAN Regional Development

On June 2, 2010, the University of Cambodia (UC) was honored to host H.E. Dr. R. M. Marty M. Natalegawa, Foreign Minister of the Republic of Indonesia, as part of the Asia Leadership Center’s Eminent Leaders Lecture Series.

Prior to speaking on the topic of ASEAN and its role in regional development, H.E. Dr. Marty Natalegawa was conferred an honorary doctorate degree in International Relations by H.E. Dr. Kao Kim Hourn, President of UC and Secretary of State for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.

Prior to speaking on the topic of ASEAN and its role in regional development, H.E. Dr. Marty Natalegawa was conferred an honorary doctorate degree in International Relations by H.E. Dr. Kao Kim Hourn, President of UC and Secretary of State for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation.

recognition for its global contributions when it plays host to the ASEAN chair.”He also noted that Cambodia and Indonesia
have had very strong relations in the past, and these types of lectures and international learning experiences can only help strengthen the relationship and promote better cultural understanding between the two nations.

Stating that the world has changed significantly since the founding of ASEAN in 1967, Dr. Natalegawa discussed how ASEAN now plays a major role in international dialogues and decision-making on issues that include development, economic growth, climate change, and global peace. Furthermore, he shared his vision for Indonesia’s upcoming chairmanship of ASEAN (which starts in 2011) and referred to the transformation of Indonesia as a reflection of ASEAN.


“Indonesia has the world’s third best economy after the global crisis, as Indonesia is closer together than ever before, but democracy is a work in progress and it is there to help provide a better lifestyle for its people,” stated Dr. Natalegawa, who expressed great hope that ASEAN can become stronger and more cohesive for the benefit of the entire region.

ASEAN will aim for what it calls regional architecture building, a dynamic equilibrium for the region that stresses inclusivity.Countries will be engaged in multisectoral issues--politics, economics, environment, social, and cultural--and ASEAN will also invite key players from outside the region to participate in the ongoing evolving regional architecture to maintain this equilibrium.

In closing, Dr. Natalegawa praised the ambition and diversity of the region and urged people to work together, emphasizing that “ASEAN is about people, harmony, and prosperity.”

In October 2009, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono appointed H.E. Dr. Marty Natalegawa as the youngest Indonesian
Foreign Minister in his cabinet. Dr. Natalegawa has also served as Chief of Staff of the Office of the Minister of Foreign
Affairs, Director General for ASEAN Cooperation, Ambassador to the United Kingdom and Permanent Representative to the United Nations.

 


Editor’s Note:

In this edition, we feature a few articles that highlight two very important themes at the University of Cambodia: student-centered learning and research (both at the student and faculty level).

Successful educators around the world understand that different students learn in different ways, and that students have individual learning
needs, strategies, and aspirations. These educators support and applaud learning across all fields, from the hard sciences to creative arts and athletics. They understand that excellence in learning is excellence and learning, and that there is significant value to society when students explore diverse learning activities.

Learning (through the medium of education, whether formal or non-formal,) affords students and adults the opportunity to reach their fullest potential.

At the University of Cambodia, we recognize the value of learning as an opportunity to develop the self with respect to others. This is why we support learning development for students and faculty members, and invite you to see the exciting things UC students and faculty members are doing (see pages 14, 16-17, 19, 21, and 22).

Healthy and vibrant societies need talented individuals to fill different roles across a number of sectors. Those individuals can be scientists, artists, economists, teachers, policy-makers, lawyers, and so much more.

A rich and diverse educational experience will help to build caring communities and strong economies. For those reasons, we should all strive to support a culture of learning and growing across the fields (and across all age groups).

Seng-Dao Keo
Editor, The UC Bulletin

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